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Seaman Scott (from 2012 Miniseries)
Seaman Scott
Biological Information
Full Name Seaman Scott
Gender Male
Date of Birth Unknown
Date of Death Unknown
Cause of Death Unknown
Eye Color Dark
Alignment Good
Background Information
Hometown Unknown
Titanic Statistics
Boarded Southampton, England
Destination New York, U.S.A.
Class Deck crew
Production
Portrayer Iain McKee

Seaman Scott is a fictional Seaman of the Titanic in the 2012 Miniseries.

BiographyEdit

He is first seen where Paolo shares a cabin with him and Steward Hart.

On the night of April 14th, 1912; he stops Kenneth Barnes from entering the steerage because he saw Mabel Watson entering the steerage area with a box containing the Countess of Manton's jewelry. Lightoller arrives and tells Scott to let Barnes through, since he had given the Earl of Manton to go through Second Class to meet up with John and Muriel Batley. After Barnes enters the Steerage area, Lightoller reminds Scoot the gate is there to stop people coming the other way from getting to First Class.

After the Titanic hits the iceberg, Paolo and Scott are awaken by the sound of the Titanic not moving but when the steam escaping from the funnels echoes through the Titanic; Steward Hart jumps into action telling them that the steam is being released from the boiler room.

Scott is last seen going through the Second Class area with a few other seamen, he tells Paolo and Stewardess Desmond that the Second Class passengers have to go to the A-deck Promenade to board the lifeboats. As Paolo and Annie redirect the passengers, Scott follows the other seamen.

Scott's fate is unknown.

Historical accuracyEdit

In reality, the stewards and sailors never shared a cabin. The sailors cabins (which housed 44 people) was stationed on E-deck near Cargo hatch #2 in the bow. The First Class Dining room steward's cabins were stationed along the Scotland Road on E-deck. The Third Class steward's cabins were a deck below the First Class Dining Room Steward's cabins.

Also the cabin for the stewards, firemen/trimmers, and sailors were large cabins; not small cabins for 6 to 8 people.